D

dack, dak

Cannabis

dacks, daks

Underpants, occasionally trousers

dag

An amusing person (originally the clot of wool and excrement on the hind quarters of a sheep)

dairy

Corner shop (UK), convenience store (US), milk bar (Oz)

Dally

Short form of Dalmatian, those coming originally from Dalmatia, in Europe.

damper

Unleavened bushman's bread

date

Anus, arse, as in "Kick 'im in the date."

dead loss A project that won't succeed no matter how much is put in in terms of money or hours.

dickhead

A 'blockhead", a stupid (or contemptible) person.

digger

ANZAC soldier, battler (abbr. dig), c.19th century gold or gum digger

dill

A fool.

dip out on

To miss out, to be unsuccessful, to fail.

Ditch, the

Tasman Sea between NZ and Australia. Jump the ditch = cross the Tasman, often indefinitely.

divvy

Dividend (from betting, usually).

do one's dough

To spend all one's money.

dob

To inform on, to betray.

doco

Documentary

dodgy

Suspicious; a person with questionable motives

dog's breakfast, rough as a

Untidy, uncouth, very rough.

dog tucker, to be

In a losing or no-win situation.

dog's dinner, to be done like a

Soundly defeated, worsted, outwitted.

doing the ton

Going at a speed of 100kph

domain

Public park, esp in country towns

doodackie

Something to which the name does not come to mind

do over

To treat a person harshly, roughly or dishonestly. To thrash. To scold.

doss down

A rough, makeshift bed. To sleep in same. From "doss house".

double-dipping

Usually said of welfare beneficiaries obtaining illicit money additional to their original entitlement.

down the road

To be given the sack, to be fired (from a job).

down trou 

To remove the trousers. Sometimes another term for 'mooning"

dreaded lurgy

An imaginary disease, with which to pull a "sickie". Has also, as just "lurgy", come to mean flu-like symptoms of a real, debilitating nature.

drop

A brew or selection of liquor.

drop one's bundle

To lose self-control, to lose one's head. Also to give birth.

drop someone in it

To land someone in a difficult situation.

drunk as a skunk

Very drunk.

drunk as a wheelbarrow

Very drunk.

dry as

Very thirsty.

dry horrors

Alcoholic dehydration 

duck shove

To evade responsibility by claiming it lies with someone else, to pass the buck.

duff, up the

Pregnant

dunny

A privy, usually an outhouse toilet.

durry

A (roll-your-own) cigarette.Also as a verb, to smoke cigarettes.

dustie

Dustman, household rubbish collector

dux

Top pupil at school

E

earbash

To talk long and hard at, to bore with words, to nag.

earthquake weather

Still, humid, oppressive weather, thought to forebode earthquakes.

electric puha

Locally grown cannabis

evils

To give someone the evil eye

F

face, off one's

To be stupefied by drugs or alcohol.

fagged out

Exhausted

fair go

A sporting chance, also expression of disbelief

fair suck of the sav(eloy)

An appeal for fair play.

fairies, away with the

Said of a daydreamer, impractical person

fart, pissed as a

Very drunk.

fart-arsing (around)

Messing around.

fit as a buck rat Ready for action, very healthy.

fizz, fizzy

Fizzy drink, aerated soft drink

flaked out A person deeply asleep or drunk.

flannel

Wash cloth

flash

Sensational 

flat stick, flat out, flat to the boards

At top speed, full effort, to the limit of one's resources.

flathead

A nail with a wide, flat head.

flattie, flatty

Flat tire

flicks

Movies

flies (no flies on someone)

A clever person

flog

Steal or "nick". Also to sell at discount.

fluff

Fart

flying fox

Pulley-like contraption on wire stretched over gully etc for carrying people or goods

foodie

Food seller

football

Rugby (union), see also league, touch

footpath

Pavement, sidewalk

forest

Man-made forest for timber industry, natural forest is called bush

fossick From ancient Cornish. To search unsystematically, leisurely.

freezing worker

Usual name for slaughterman, meat packer. Freezing works = abattoir-type factory for NZ-wide and overseas markets. 

from North Cape to the Bluff

From one end of NZ to the other - old saying

front foot, to go out on the

To show support for an initiative firmly and publicly.

fuckwit

Halfwit

full on

Intense

fundie

Fundamentalist Christian, usually meant dismissively.

funny as a fit Very funny. From "funny as a fight".

G

gap your axe?, wouldn't that Wouldn't that annoy you? (From the act of hitting the axe-blade against something unyielding, and damaging the blade.

gecko, gekko

Apart from the small lizard, this means "to take a peep, a glimpse"

get off the grass

Exclamation of disbelief; equivalent to "stop pulling my leg" and "no way"

g'day, gidday, etc

Hello

gizza

Abbreviation for "give us a "

glory box

Young woman's store of linen, crockery, etc, for marriage or independent living - traditionally a wooden chest about 1m long

Godzone

NZ, "God's own country"

go for one's life

Exclamation of encouragement to begin. "There's tucker on the table. Go for your life."

going bush

To drop out of society or become reclusive

gold coin

$1 or $2 piece

golden syrup

Treacle

good

Fine (as in How are you? I'm good)

good as gold

Affirming good will, approval, agreement in reply to a question.

good keen man

Also good keen bloke/ kiwi joker. One who attacks a job, problem, situation enthusiastically but without thought of the consequences.

Good on ya, mate!

Congratulations 

good one! / nice one!

A warmly affirming reply to a suggestion, statement etc.

go out (with)

To keep company with, to "walk out" as sweethearts.

go rude at

To insult angrily

goss

Short form of gossip

graft (also hard graft)

Work of any kind. A grafter is a hard worker, grafting is working hard, hard-working.

grandies

Familiar, domestic term for grandparents.

Granny Herald

Nickname given to the New Zealand Herald

grasshopper, kneehigh to a

Very small, usually referring to when a person was a child.

greasies

Common term for fish and chips

grind

Labour or work of a monotonous type

grog

Any alcoholic liquor, booze.

grot

Short for grotty. Something very unhygienic, not clean. Also a state of feeling very unwell or uneasy.

grouse, grouce

Fine, excellent, beaut (term now falling into disuse)

growl at

To grumble, to scold, to tell off.

grunds, grundies, gruds

Underpants

grunt

Power of acceleration, as of motor vehicles (and, more recently, of computers)

gully

Small valley

gumboot, gummy

Winter wet-weather footwear, made of (black) rubber, either reaching to ankle of mid-calf.

gum digger

Miner of valuable clear golden-coloured kauri gum once used in varnishes and ornamental work

Gumboots

Large rubber overshoes ranging from calf to knee height. These are usually black, although little children may wear colourful ones. Together with shorts and a black singlet, gumboots constitute the quintessential kiwi-joker or farmer's outfit.

gun, big gun

Person of considerable importance

gun, to be in the

To be out of favour, in line for punishment

gurgler

A plug hole of a sink, or outflow from a toilet bowl, after the gurgling noise of the water. "To go down the gurgler" = to be ruined, to go "down the drain".

gutser, gitser

A heavy fall. "To come a gutser" = to fall on one's guts, to come a cropper, to fail significantly, to make a bad mistake. "You came a real gutser over that, mate."

guts for garters

To be in big trouble

gutsful, gutful; to have a

To have enough, or a bellyful, of a situation, past the point of patience and tolerance.

gutsing

To gorge on food; also to steal utilities such as water and power.